Predator- Prey

Predator- Prey

Predator- Prey, 2017. acrylic, graphite prepared archival foam core panels. 80 x 87"

The Woods are populated with taxidermy animals that are inserted into the scene. Both the backdrop and animals are from original photography. There is often a personal memory of the photo locations of the taxidermy. The mountain lion came from an antique store in Phoenix. The woods were photographed in Washington State. In this piece there is a predator-prey relationship. 

Predator- Prey

Predator- Prey

Predator- Prey, 2017. acrylic, graphite prepared archival foam core panels. 80 x 87"

The Woods are populated with taxidermy animals that are inserted into the scene. Both the backdrop and animals are from original photography. There is often a personal memory of the photo locations of the taxidermy. The mountain lion came from an antique store in Phoenix. The woods were photographed in Washington State. In this piece there is a predator-prey relationship. 

Predator- Prey

Predator- Prey

Predator- Prey, 2017. acrylic, graphite prepared archival foam core panels. 80 x 87" Tikkun Olam II exhibition, Cutler Plotkin Jewish Heritage Center, Phoenix AZ.

The Woods are populated with taxidermy animals that are inserted into the scene. Both the backdrop and animals are from original photography. There is often a personal memory of the photo locations of the taxidermy. The mountain lion came from an antique store in Phoenix. The woods were photographed in Washington State. In this piece there is a predator-prey relationship. 

Urban Yard Nature

Urban Yard Nature

Urban Yard Nature, 2017 collected natural objects in 18 spice jars. 4 1/2 by 37" 

These 18 spice jars contain natural specimens collected in my Central Phoenix yard. It is natural for me to collect these types of things and I have been doing it for years. My yard is a Certified Wildlife Habitat, along with a posted sign. This self-certification can be done by anyone through the National Wildlife Federation. This has guided my husband and I in how we have managed our lot through the years. It is a commitment to provide food, water, cover, places to raise young, and sustainable practices. In our case, food is provided through plant diversity and water is a birdbath. The jars contain a variety of things including dead insects, birds, and a rat, but they represent the abundance of life that can happen on a single lot. 

Urban Yard Nature- detail

Urban Yard Nature- detail

Urban Yard Nature, 2017 collected natural objects in 18 spice jars. 4 1/2 by 37" (detail)

These spice jars contain natural specimens collected in my Central Phoenix yard. It is natural for me to collect these types of things and I have been doing it for years. My yard is a Certified Wildlife Habitat, along with a posted sign. This self-certification can be done by anyone through the National Wildlife Federation. This has guided my husband and I in how we have managed our lot through the years. It is a commitment to provide food, water, cover, places to raise young, and sustainable practices. In our case, food is provided through plant diversity and water is a birdbath. The jars contain a variety of things including dead insects, birds, and a rat, but they represent the abundance of life that can happen on a single lot. 

Urban Yard Nature- detail

Urban Yard Nature- detail

Urban Yard Nature, 2017 collected natural objects in 18 spice jars. 4 1/2 by 37" 

These 18 spice jars contain natural specimens collected in my Central Phoenix yard. It is natural for me to collect these types of things and I have been doing it for years. My yard is a Certified Wildlife Habitat, along with a posted sign. This self-certification can be done by anyone through the National Wildlife Federation. This has guided my husband and I in how we have managed our lot through the years. It is a commitment to provide food, water, cover, places to raise young, and sustainable practices. In our case, food is provided through plant diversity and water is a birdbath. The jars contain a variety of things including dead insects, birds, and a rat, but they represent the abundance of life that can happen on a single lot. 

Untitled (sticks)

Untitled (sticks)

Untitled (sticks), 2017 sticks from yard pruning on metal grate. 42 1/2" wide.

This installation of sticks represents things happening in my yard. This is where I do a large amount of composting and have arrangements of sticks that provide cover for insects and lizards. Traditional yards often use pesticides, insecticides, and chemical fertilizers along with an excessive tidiness that treats leaves, branches and grass clippings as trash. Topsoil, usually 2 to 8 inches, is a concentration of organic matter that provides necessary fertility. When topsoil is depleted and abused the microbial life sinks deeper underground. Often we simply need to allow what happens naturally to happen. As an artist I am usually trying to create things that are stabile and will last, but much of what I do in the yard is facilitating the disappearance of natural materials through composting. The sticks, which come from yard pruning, are a re-creation of a mound I created a few years back. It is habitat and outdoor sculpture, while composting slowly. This piece will be transferred to the yard after the exhibition to start its slow deconstruction.

Preservation Woods

Preservation Woods

Preservation Woods, 2015  acrylic, graphite on prepared archival foam core panels. 80 x 160"

The woods are populated with taxidermy animals that are inserted into the scene. Both the backdrop and the animals are from original photography. There is a personal connection to each image and memory of photo locations. The woods were photographed in Stehekin, Washington while the white deer came from a frame shop in Tempe, AZ. The zebra was found in a bar in Florence, AZ and the Jacob ram was in a hair salon in downtown Phoenix.

Preservation Woods, install shot

Preservation Woods, install shot

Preservation Woods, 2015  acrylic, graphite on prepared archival foam core panels. 80 x 160" Installation view, Arizona Biennial, Tucson Museum of Art, 2015

The woods are populated with taxidermy animals that are inserted into the scene. Both the backdrop and the animals are from original photography. There is a personal connection to each image and memory of photo locations. The woods were photographed in Stehekin, Washington while the white deer came from a frame shop in Tempe, AZ. The zebra was found in a bar in Florence, AZ and the Jacob ram was in a hair salon in downtown Phoenix.

Preservation Woods- detail

Preservation Woods- detail

Preservation Woods, (detail) 2015  acrylic, graphite on prepared archival foam core panels. 80 x 160"

The woods are populated with taxidermy animals that are inserted into the scene. Both the backdrop and the animals are from original photography. There is a personal connection to each image and memory of photo locations. The woods were photographed in Stehekin, Washington while the Jacob ram was in a hair salon in downtown Phoenix.

Bear- Bear 2

Bear- Bear 2

Bear- Bear 2, 2016. graphite, acrylic on prepared paper. 17 x 17"

This series pairs an animal with a matching animal object. The bear on the left I photographed at World Wildlife Zoo, Litchfield Park, AZ,  and the object I own. The drawings play with real and fake along with revealing a sentimental possession of objects which function as surrogates. We have a desire for animals to be in our life whether they are wild, in captivity, taxidermy or represented as objects or mascots.

Wolf- Wolf

Wolf- Wolf

Wolf- Wolf, 2016. graphite, acrylic on prepared paper. 14 x 20"

This series pairs an animal with a matching animal object. The wolf on the right I photographed at the Phoenix Zoo, and the other is an object I own. The drawings play with real and fake along with revealing a sentimental possession of objects which function as surrogates. We have a desire for animals to be in our life whether they are wild, in captivity, taxidermy or represented as objects or mascots.

Rhino- Rhino

Rhino- Rhino

Rhino- Rhino, 2015  graphite, acrylic on prepared paper. 15 x 20"

This series pairs an animal with a matching animal object. The Rhino I photographed at the Phoenix Zoo, and the other is an object I own. The drawings play with real and fake along with revealing a sentimental possession of objects which function as surrogates. We have a desire for animals to be in our life whether they are wild, in captivity, taxidermy or represented as objects or mascots.

Lemur- Lemur

Lemur- Lemur

Lemur- Lemur, 2016. graphite, acrylic on prepared paper. 12 x 12"

This series pairs an animal with a matching animal object. The lemur on the right I photographed at the Wildlife World Zoo in Litchfield Park, AZ, and the other is an object I own. The drawings play with real and fake along with revealing a sentimental possession of objects which function as surrogates. We have a desire for animals to be in our life whether they are wild, in captivity, taxidermy or represented as objects or mascots.

Otter- Otter

Otter- Otter

Otter- Otter, 2016. graphite, acrylic on prepared paper. 12 x 12"

This series pairs an animal with a matching animal object. The otter on the left I photographed at the Phoenix Zoo, and the other is an object I own. The drawings play with real and fake along with revealing a sentimental possession of objects which function as surrogates. We have a desire for animals to be in our life whether they are wild, in captivity, taxidermy or represented as objects or mascots.

Jaguar- Jaguar 2

Jaguar- Jaguar 2

Jaguar- Jaguar 2, 2015. graphite, acrylic on prepared canvas panel. 12 x 12"

This series pairs an animal with a matching animal object. The jaguar on the right I photographed at the Phoenix Zoo, and the other is an object I own. The drawings play with real and fake along with revealing a sentimental possession of objects which function as surrogates. We have a desire for animals to be in our life whether they are wild, in captivity, taxidermy or represented as objects or mascots.

Baboon- Baboon

Baboon- Baboon

Baboon- Baboon, 2014. graphite, acrylic on prepared canvas panel. 12 x 12"

This series pairs an animal with a matching animal object. The baboon on the right I photographed at the Phoenix Zoo, and the other is an object I own. The drawings play with real and fake along with revealing a sentimental possession of objects which function as surrogates. We have a desire for animals to be in our life whether they are wild, in captivity, taxidermy or represented as objects or mascots.

Monkey- Monkey

Monkey- Monkey

Monkey- Monkey, 2015. graphite, acrylic on canvas panel. 8 x 8"

This series pairs an animal with a matching animal object. The monkey I photographed at the Phoenix Zoo, and the other is an object I own. The drawings play with real and fake along with revealing a sentimental possession of objects which function as surrogates. We have a desire for animals to be in our life whether they are wild, in captivity, taxidermy or represented as objects or mascots.

Stehekin Deer- Breyer Deer

Stehekin Deer- Breyer Deer

Stehekin Deer- Breyer Deer, 2013

This series pairs an animal or animals with a matching animal object.  I photographed the deer in Stehekin Washington, and the object I own. The drawings play with real and fake along with revealing a sentimental possession of objects which function as surrogates. We have a desire for animals to be in our life whether they are wild, in captivity, taxidermy or represented as objects or mascots.

Jaguar- Jaguar 1

Jaguar- Jaguar 1

Jaguar- Jaguar 1, 2014. graphite, acrylic on prepared canvas panel. 8 x 15"

This series pairs an animal with a matching animal object. The jaguar on the right I photographed at Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle, and the other is an object I own. The drawings play with real and fake along with revealing a sentimental possession of objects which function as surrogates. We have a desire for animals to be in our life whether they are wild, in captivity, taxidermy or represented as objects or mascots.

Bear- Bear 1

Bear- Bear 1

Bear- Bear 1, 2013. graphite, acrylic on prepared canvas panel. 12 x 12"

This series pairs an animal with a matching animal object. The bear on the left I photographed at the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle, and the other is an object I own. The drawings play with real and fake along with revealing a sentimental possession of objects which function as surrogates. We have a desire for animals to be in our life whether they are wild, in captivity, taxidermy or represented as objects or mascots.

The Woods- Fabrication/Bears

The Woods- Fabrication/Bears

The Woods- Fabrication/Bears, 2014.  graphite, acrylic on prepared paper. 11 x 30"

The bear objects are personal possessions that refer to my attraction to animal forms, even small collectible objects. Somewhat the way society increasingly surrounds itself with synthetic animal portrayals. The disconnection created as more people live in cities, and there is less nature in the world. The woods are Stehekin, Washington, a place that my sister and I have spent time together.

 

Bear Gifts

Bear Gifts

Bear Gifts, 2012. graphite on prepared paper. 8 x 11"

My sister gave me the sitting bear, made of flocked ceramic, when I was 2 or 3 years old.  It was purchased in a gift shop in Yellowstone Park during a family vacation.  Then in 2011, my sister called me to tell me that she was in that very gift shop, 50 years later, and was buying the current version of a souvenir bear object.  That is the walking bear, made of plastic, still wearing its made in Germany sticker.  The woods are in Stehekin, Washington, a place that my sister and I have spent time together.  We even encountered a wild bear while hiking there.  The drawing combines silly and serious, and references loss of wild places. 

The Woods- Fabrication

The Woods- Fabrication

The Woods- Fabrication, 2012.  graphite on prepared paper. 11 x 30"

This drawing portrays animal figurines in a wooded setting, and these objects are stand-ins for the real thing. I find humor in the fact that I am attracted to these objects as a substitute for the real thing. The objects are personal possessions that have sentimental connections. The ceramic turtle was a gift from a great grandmother, the cat was inherited from another grandmother, and the squirrel nutcracker was a gift during an artist residency. Also included is a wooden male figure, which was hand-carved by the my father. The woods are drawn from my snapshots of Stehekin Washington, a place I have a personal connection to. These objects, placed in the woods, emphasize society’s expanding disconnection from the natural world.   

The Woods- Preservation

The Woods- Preservation

The Woods- Preservation, 2011.  graphite on prepared paper. 24 x 40"

The woods are populated with taxidermy animals that are inserted into the scene. Both the backdrop and the animals are from original photography. There is a personal connection to each image and memory of photo locations. The woods were photographed in Stehekin, Washington while the Bison came from a sports bar in Phoenix. The moose is from El Tovar at the south rim of the Grand Canyon, the deer mount from a Seattle antique shop, and the beaver from forest service building in Stehekin, Washington. 

The Woods

The Woods

The Woods, 2009. graphite on prepared wooden panel. 24 x 54"

This drawing is a fictional scene representing the suicide of someone I met once. The fact that this woman chose to go to the woods for site of her death filled my head with repeating thoughts and images.  This was due to the act, but also due to the fact that I spent my childhood in the NW where I was never far from a body of woods.  We even had a section behind our house that I could, and did, enter regularly. So with this suicide it seemed like she had gone home to mother nature. Almost like entering the woods is a version of re-entering the womb. I chose to populate my imagined scene with a large number of animals to represent the imprinting that her death created in the particular location. The woman is not represented but the animals are drawn by curiosity to something that they can feel.  There are 50 birds, animals, and reptiles within the scene. 

Narrative: Within a few days she bought a gun, made some positive phone calls, and left her dog with a friend. She parked at the trailhead, walked three miles, and then another mile off the trail. Her body was not found for weeks. 

 

The Woods, detail

The Woods, detail

The Woods, 2009. (detail) graphite on prepared wooden panel. 24 x 54"

This drawing is a fictional scene representing the suicide of someone I met once. The fact that this woman chose to go to the woods for site of her death filled my head with repeating thoughts and images.  This was due to the act, but also due to the fact that I spent my childhood in the NW where I was never far from a body of woods.  We even had a section behind our house that I could, and did, enter regularly. So with this suicide it seemed like she had gone home to mother nature. Almost like entering the woods is a version of re-entering the womb. I chose to populate my imagined scene with a large number of animals to represent the imprinting that her death created in the particular location. The woman is not represented but the animals are drawn by curiosity to something that they can feel.  There are 50 birds, animals, and reptiles within the scene. 

Narrative: Within a few days she bought a gun, made some positive phone calls, and left her dog with a friend. She parked at the trailhead, walked three miles, and then another mile off the trail. Her body was not found for weeks. 

Urban Water, video still

Urban Water, video still

Urban Water, video still, 2012. Video shot with home security motion activated camera. 45 min's. 

Urban Water was shot with a motion activated home security camera in my central Phoenix front yard. Inspired by wildlife trap cameras, I wanted to capture the wild life contained within a city lot. The wildlife is attracted to our yard by the regular source of water and the food and shelter provided by the diversity of plants and trees in our yard. Other than that, we do not feed the birds. The cats were feral and also not fed by us. We would see cats on a regular basis, but it is a tough life for these cats and they didn't seem to last more that 6 months to a year. At the time of this video, a large black cat was spending a lot of his time in our yard. Within a day of disconnecting the camera his body was found in a ditch behind our house. He appeared to have been hit by a car. My husband and I buried him in the front yard. One my favorite birds during the time of the video was a large baby grackle who was spending a lot of time at the water dish. I stopped seeing him suddenly and it is possible the black cat killed him. This water dish is visible from our front porch and living room window, but the camera allows a proximity that would not be allowed, even by birds conditioned to city life.  

Urban Water, video still

Urban Water, video still

Urban Water, video still, 2012. Video shot with home security motion activated camera. 45 min's. 

Urban Water was shot with a motion activated home security camera in my central Phoenix front yard. Inspired by wildlife trap cameras, I wanted to capture the wild life contained within a city lot. The wildlife is attracted to our yard by the regular source of water and the food and shelter provided by the diversity of plants and trees in our yard. Other than that, we do not feed the birds. The cats were feral and also not fed by us. We would see cats on a regular basis, but it is a tough life for these cats and they didn't seem to last more that 6 months to a year. At the time of this video, a large black cat was spending a lot of his time in our yard. Within a day of disconnecting the camera his body was found in a ditch behind our house. He appeared to have been hit by a car. My husband and I buried him in the front yard. One my favorite birds during the time of the video was a large baby grackle who was spending a lot of time at the water dish. I stopped seeing him suddenly and it is possible the black cat killed him. This water dish is visible from our front porch and living room window, but the camera allows a proximity that would not be allowed, even by birds conditioned to city life.  

Urban Water, video still

Urban Water, video still

Urban Water, video still, 2012. Video shot with home security motion activated camera. 45 min's. 

Urban Water was shot with a motion activated home security camera in my central Phoenix front yard. Inspired by wildlife trap cameras, I wanted to capture the wild life contained within a city lot. The wildlife is attracted to our yard by the regular source of water and the food and shelter provided by the diversity of plants and trees in our yard. Other than that, we do not feed the birds. The cats were feral and also not fed by us. We would see cats on a regular basis, but it is a tough life for these cats and they didn't seem to last more that 6 months to a year. At the time of this video, a large black cat was spending a lot of his time in our yard. Within a day of disconnecting the camera his body was found in a ditch behind our house. He appeared to have been hit by a car. My husband and I buried him in the front yard. One my favorite birds during the time of the video was a large baby grackle who was spending a lot of time at the water dish. I stopped seeing him suddenly and it is possible the black cat killed him. This water dish is visible from our front porch and living room window, but the camera allows a proximity that would not be allowed, even by birds conditioned to city life.  

Urban Water, video still

Urban Water, video still

Urban Water, video still, 2012. Video shot with home security motion activated camera. 45 min's. 

Urban Water was shot with a motion activated home security camera in my central Phoenix front yard. Inspired by wildlife trap cameras, I wanted to capture the wild life contained within a city lot. The wildlife is attracted to our yard by the regular source of water and the food and shelter provided by the diversity of plants and trees in our yard. Other than that, we do not feed the birds. The cats were feral and also not fed by us. We would see cats on a regular basis, but it is a tough life for these cats and they didn't seem to last more that 6 months to a year. At the time of this video, a large black cat was spending a lot of his time in our yard. Within a day of disconnecting the camera his body was found in a ditch behind our house. He appeared to have been hit by a car. My husband and I buried him in the front yard. One my favorite birds during the time of the video was a large baby grackle who was spending a lot of time at the water dish. I stopped seeing him suddenly and it is possible the black cat killed him. This water dish is visible from our front porch and living room window, but the camera allows a proximity that would not be allowed, even by birds conditioned to city life.  

Portrait

Portrait

Portrait, 2011.  graphite, gouache on prepared canvas. 45 1/2 x 86"

 Portrait is a grid-based drawing comprised of two hundred 4” portraits of animals.  The 85” wide drawing is done on a single piece of stretched canvas.  It is my intention that the animals get the same respect as people.  That is why, in Portrait, I rendered them accurately so that they are portraits of each individual animal.  Each animal is making eye contact with the viewer the way people do in yearbook photos.  When you stand in front of the piece there are 200 pairs of eyes. 

Portrait, detail

Portrait, detail

Portrait, 2011.  graphite, gouache on prepared canvas. 45 1/2 x 86"

 Portrait is a grid-based drawing comprised of two hundred 4” portraits of animals.  The 85” wide drawing is done on a single piece of stretched canvas.  It is my intention that the animals get the same respect as people.  That is why, in Portrait, I rendered them accurately so that they are portraits of each individual animal.  Each animal is making eye contact with the viewer the way people do in yearbook photos.  When you stand in front of the piece there are 200 pairs of eyes. 

Portrait, detail

Portrait, detail

Portrait, 2011.  graphite, gouache on prepared canvas. 45 1/2 x 86"

 Portrait is a grid-based drawing comprised of two hundred 4” portraits of animals.  The 85” wide drawing is done on a single piece of stretched canvas.  It is my intention that the animals get the same respect as people.  That is why, in Portrait, I rendered them accurately so that they are portraits of each individual animal.  Each animal is making eye contact with the viewer the way people do in yearbook photos.  When you stand in front of the piece there are 200 pairs of eyes. 

Most Striking Characteristics 1

Most Striking Characteristics 1

Most Striking Characteristics 1, 2006. gouache, acrylic, xerox on paper. 12 x 9"

For these collage/paintings I used a Xerox machine to re-size the animals to a similar scale and stacked them totem like. I was raised in the Seattle area and was exposed a number of totem poles. I always thought Washington State Native Americans made them, but in fact Alaska and Canadian tribes produced them.  Here I am playing with their forms without any deep totem significance. For the title, I used one of the dictionary definitions for profile. 

Most Striking Characteristics 2

Most Striking Characteristics 2

Most Striking Characteristics 2, 2006. gouache, acrylic, xerox on paper. 12 x 9"

For these collage/paintings I used a Xerox machine to re-size the animals to a similar scale and stacked them totem like. I was raised in the Seattle area and was exposed a number of totem poles. I always thought Washington State Native Americans made them, but in fact Alaska and Canadian tribes produced them.  Here I am playing with their forms without any deep totem significance. For the title, I used one of the dictionary definitions for profile. 

Most Striking Characteristics 3

Most Striking Characteristics 3

Most Striking Characteristics 3, 2006. gouache, acrylic, xerox on paper. 12 x 9"

For these collage/paintings I used a Xerox machine to re-size the animals to a similar scale and stacked them totem like. I was raised in the Seattle area and was exposed a number of totem poles. I always thought Washington State Native Americans made them, but in fact Alaska and Canadian tribes produced them.  Here I am playing with their forms without any deep totem significance. For the title, I used one of the dictionary definitions for profile. 

Most Striking Characteristics 4

Most Striking Characteristics 4

Most Striking Characteristics 4, 2006. gouache, acrylic, xerox on paper. 12 x 9"

For these collage/paintings I used a Xerox machine to re-size the animals to a similar scale and stacked them totem like. I was raised in the Seattle area and was exposed a number of totem poles. I always thought Washington State Native Americans made them, but in fact Alaska and Canadian tribes produced them.  Here I am playing with their forms without any deep totem significance. For the title, I used one of the dictionary definitions for profile. 

Most Striking Characteristics 6

Most Striking Characteristics 6

Most Striking Characteristics 6, 2006. gouache, acrylic, xerox on paper. 12 x 9"

For these collage/paintings I used a Xerox machine to re-size the animals to a similar scale and stacked them totem like. I was raised in the Seattle area and was exposed a number of totem poles. I always thought Washington State Native Americans made them, but in fact Alaska and Canadian tribes produced them.  Here I am playing with their forms without any deep totem significance. For the title, I used one of the dictionary definitions for profile. 

Most Striking Characteristics 7

Most Striking Characteristics 7

Most Striking Characteristics 1, 2006. gouache, acrylic, xerox on paper. 12 x 9"

For these collage/paintings I used a Xerox machine to re-size the animals to a similar scale and stacked them totem like. I was raised in the Seattle area and was exposed a number of totem poles. I always thought Washington State Native Americans made them, but in fact Alaska and Canadian tribes produced them.  Here I am playing with their forms without any deep totem significance. For the title, I used one of the dictionary definitions for profile. 

Most Striking Characteristics 8

Most Striking Characteristics 8

Most Striking Characteristics 8, 2006. gouache, acrylic, xerox on paper. 12 x 9"

For these collage/paintings I used a Xerox machine to re-size the animals to a similar scale and stacked them totem like. I was raised in the Seattle area and was exposed a number of totem poles. I always thought Washington State Native Americans made them, but in fact Alaska and Canadian tribes produced them.  Here I am playing with their forms without any deep totem significance. For the title, I used one of the dictionary definitions for profile. 

Most Striking Characteristics 9

Most Striking Characteristics 9

Most Striking Characteristics 9, 2006. gouache, acrylic, xerox on paper. 12 x 9"

For these collage/paintings I used a Xerox machine to re-size the animals to a similar scale and stacked them totem like. I was raised in the Seattle area and was exposed a number of totem poles. I always thought Washington State Native Americans made them, but in fact Alaska and Canadian tribes produced them.  Here I am playing with their forms without any deep totem significance. For the title, I used one of the dictionary definitions for profile. 

Untitled

Untitled

Untitled, 2003.  gouache, sumi ink, graphite, acrylic on 33 rag board panels. 112 x 202"

After a couple years of doing self-portraits I introduced animals by wearing them in a hat-like fashion. Possible interpretations such as spirit animals, totems, hunting trophies, and exploitation are open to the viewer. In wanting to give voice to the animals it seemed my image was more interesting when topped with an animal, and the animal was more interesting than if alone. 

 

Untitled, installation view

Untitled, installation view

Untitled, installation view, 2003.  gouache, sumi ink, graphite, acrylic on 33 rag board panels. 112 x 202"  Willo North Gallery, Phoenix. 

After a couple years of doing self-portraits, I introduced animals by wearing them in a hat-like fashion. Possible interpretations such as spirit animals, totems, hunting trophies, and exploitation are open to the viewer. In wanting to give voice to the animals it seemed my image was more interesting when topped with an animal, and the animal was more interesting than if alone. 

Untitled, detail

Untitled, detail

Untitled, (detail) 2003.  gouache, sumi ink, graphite, acrylic on 33 rag board panels. 112 x 202" individual panels- 22 x 30"

After a couple years of doing self-portraits I introduced animals by wearing them in a hat-like fashion. Possible interpretations such as spirit animals, totems, hunting trophies, and exploitation are open to the viewer. In wanting to give voice to the animals it seemed my image was more interesting when topped with an animal, and the animal was more interesting than if alone. 

Untitled, detail

Untitled, detail

Untitled, (detail) 2003.  gouache, sumi ink, graphite, acrylic on 33 rag board panels. 112 x 202" individual panels- 22 x 30"

After a couple years of doing self-portraits I introduced animals by wearing them in a hat-like fashion. Possible interpretations such as spirit animals, totems, hunting trophies, and exploitation are open to the viewer. In wanting to give voice to the animals it seemed my image was more interesting when topped with an animal, and the animal was more interesting than if alone. 

Untitled, detail

Untitled, detail

Untitled, (detail) 2003.  gouache, sumi ink, graphite, acrylic on 33 rag board panels. 112 x 202" individual panels- 22 x 30"

After a couple years of doing self-portraits I introduced animals by wearing them in a hat-like fashion. Possible interpretations such as spirit animals, totems, hunting trophies, and exploitation are open to the viewer. In wanting to give voice to the animals it seemed my image was more interesting when topped with an animal, and the animal was more interesting than if alone. 

Untitled, detail

Untitled, detail

Untitled, (detail) 2003.  gouache, sumi ink, graphite, acrylic on 33 rag board panels. 112 x 202" individual panels- 22 x 30"

After a couple years of doing self-portraits I introduced animals by wearing them in a hat-like fashion. Possible interpretations such as spirit animals, totems, hunting trophies, and exploitation are open to the viewer. In wanting to give voice to the animals it seemed my image was more interesting when topped with an animal, and the animal was more interesting than if alone. 

Untitled, detail

Untitled, detail

Untitled, (detail) 2003.  gouache, sumi ink, graphite, acrylic on 33 rag board panels. 112 x 202" individual panels- 22 x 30"

After a couple years of doing self-portraits I introduced animals by wearing them in a hat-like fashion. Possible interpretations such as spirit animals, totems, hunting trophies, and exploitation are open to the viewer. In wanting to give voice to the animals it seemed my image was more interesting when topped with an animal, and the animal was more interesting than if alone. 

Untitled, detail

Untitled, detail

Untitled, (detail) 2003.  gouache, sumi ink, graphite, acrylic on 33 rag board panels. 112 x 202" individual panels- 22 x 30"

After a couple years of doing self-portraits I introduced animals by wearing them in a hat-like fashion. Possible interpretations such as spirit animals, totems, hunting trophies, and exploitation are open to the viewer. In wanting to give voice to the animals it seemed my image was more interesting when topped with an animal, and the animal was more interesting than if alone. 

Lion Self-Portrait

Lion Self-Portrait

Lion Self-Portrait, 2002. monotype  10 x 10"

After a couple years of doing self-portraits, I introduced animals by wearing them in a hat-like fashion. Possible interpretations such as spirit animals, totems, hunting trophies, and exploitation are open to the viewer. In wanting to give voice to the animals it seemed my image was more interesting when topped with an animal, and the animal was more interesting than if alone. 

Marmot Self-Portrait

Marmot Self-Portrait

Marmot Self-Portrait, 2002. monotype

After a couple years of doing self-portraits, I introduced animals by wearing them in a hat-like fashion. Possible interpretations such as spirit animals, totems, hunting trophies, and exploitation are open to the viewer. In wanting to give voice to the animals it seemed my image was more interesting when topped with an animal, and the animal was more interesting than if alone. 

Journal Series

Journal Series

Journal Series, studio installation, 2009

Journals

Journals

End view of stacked journals.